The Yawpers

Photo credit: Megan Holmes

Next time I hear someone say rock is dead, I’m going to point them to The Yawpers and specifically this tasteful cardboard cutout of frontman Nate Cook. For their fourth album, the Denver trio tightened things up for their best album; a 38 minute effort that Cook wrote in a therapeutic state of mind. “I wanted to take a crack at using these songs as therapy, really,” Cook said. “I think I’ve always been inclined to write more towards the dregs of my psyche, and explore my depressions and trauma, rather than describe a way out.”

Human Question opens up with a couple of quintessential Yawpers tracks; you know the type that seem to be holding on for dear life – guitarist Jesse Parmet and drummer Alex Koshak just letting these bluesy psychobilly riffs rip while Cook wails over them. Hell, a little later on the album; the boys invite “Harry Connick Jr.” to help out on the maniacal Earn Your Heaven; one of Human Questions highlights. These are the types of tracks that lured me into The Yawpers web and keep me coming back.

But on Human Question, The Yawpers also manage to sand off a couple of the rough patches as well, sort of reminding me of when Elliott BROOD tone things down a bit; almost as if they’re trying their best to keep a lid on their energy. Man As Ghost, Carry Me and Where the Winters End really show a more mature seasoned approach to their music and I welcome it.

So in conclusion, as long as bands like The Yawpers are around, you can shove your Rock Is Dead thinkpieces up your ass.

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The Yawpers are here

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Photo credit: Megan Holmes

Words always seem to escape me when describing The Yawpers. They are a force of nature that leave a trail of destruction and a smile on your face (probably a look of bewilderment as well). They’re back with their follow up to Boy In A Well via the fine folks at Bloodshot Records on 4/19. Here’s some info via the PR squad.

Following their critically acclaimed and meticulously plotted concept album Boy in a Well (set in World War I France, concerning a mother who abandoned her unwanted newborn), the Yawpers created Human Question with a contrasting immediacy. The album was written, rehearsed and recorded over a two-month period with Reliable Recordings’ Alex Hall (Cactus Blossoms, JD McPherson) at Chicago’s renowned Electrical Audio. The band tracked live in one room, feeding off the collective energy and adding few overdubs. Through the new approach, 10 songs connect with an organically linked attitude and style.

“I wanted to take a crack at using these songs as therapy, really,” said lead singer and guitarist Nate Cook. “I think I’ve always been inclined to write more towards the dregs of my psyche, and explore my depressions and trauma, rather than describe a way out.”

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The Yawpers are here

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The Yawpers – Boy In A Well (album review)

by Woody on August 29, 2017

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In a nutshell, The Yawpers are a powder keg, They are volatile and you don’t know when they’re going to blow; but rest assured they will sooner or later. Fronted by Nate Cook, a man who’s stage presence should only be described as maniacal. He’s like Elvis after a day of electroconvulsive therapy that maybe went too far. Cook is backed by Jesse Parmet on guitar and drummer Noah Shomberg who give Cook the psycholbilly sound that fits Cook’s voice like a glove.

For their third album and second with Bloodshot Cook arose from a Dramamine-alcohol induced ‘coma” with the outline of an album about a French woman abandoning her son in a well during WWI. With other bands, I would roll my eyes and mutter “oh fuck off” under my breath. With The Yawpers, I shrugged my shoulders and muttered to myself, “sounds about right.”

Over on COS, the boys did a blow by blow breakdown of each song that is worth a read. In a nutshell, the boy survives, later has an Oedipal encounter with his mother and everybody dies; including the son of the Mother and her son (i.e. her grandson). Along for the ride of the ride was Tommy Stinson. Fresh off the release of the excellent Anything Can Happen, Stinson lends his talents to the production end and also chips in on a few tracks.

Some of my favorite tracks are Mon Dieu, The Awe & The Anguish and penultimate track; Linen For The Orphan. The story may be hard to follow without those handy notes on COS. While it certainly helped in my appreciation of the album, it isn’t required. These guys are what rock and roll is all about.

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The Yawpers are here

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During this past SXSW, I witnessed my first Yapwers set. It left me a bit shaken but with a smile on my face. Purveyors of the greatest music video of all time, I shouldn’t have expected any less. Boy In A Well will be their second Bloodshot release, after 2015’s American Man.

Someone stuck the label of psyschobilly on them and being that I can’t think of anything better, I’m going to go with it. It was recorded here in Chicago with help from none other than Tommy Stinson. Here’s a little more on the album – The Yawpers’ third album Boy in a Well is a sensational tragedy set in World War I France about a mother abandoning her unwanted newborn child. But, like the band itself, there’s so much more roiling beneath the surface.

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The Yawpers are here

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The Yawpers sign to Bloodshout, announce American Man 10/30/15

September 17, 2015

The Yawpers’ name stems from a line in Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass”: “I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world.” Hailing from Denver, they are the latest entry on to the venerable Bloodshot catalog. They played a bastardized version of delta blues and punk. American Man will be their sophomore effort. […]

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