The Beths

Photo credit: Mason Fairey

The Beths were one of my crew’s top artists at SXSW ’19. Their debut, Future Hates Me was one of our favorites of 2018. Jump Rope Gazers will be out on 6/10 via the fine folks at Carpark Records. Here’s some more info from the PR team.

Stokes’s writing on Jump Rope Gazers grapples with the uneasy proposition of leaving everything and everyone you know behind on another continent, chasing your dreams while struggling to stay close with loved ones back home. Rambunctious lead single “Dying to Believe” reckons with the distance that life necessarily drives between people over time: “I’m sorry for the way that I can’t hold conversations // They’re such a fragile thing to try to support the weight of,” Stokes sings. The accompanying visual is an eccentric four-step “How to be the Beths” instructional video featuring the band.

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The Beths are here

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Photo by Mason Fairey

Future Me Hates Me gives me the same feeling that Diet Cig’s I Swear I’m Good At This did. It finds that sweet spot between pop-punk and power-pop as lead singer Elizabeth Stoke delivers the goods across ten tracks. And I’d be lying if I said her Kiwi accent didn’t add something to my enjoyment.

From the opening chords of Great No One you’ll find your feet tapping and head bobbing as Stokes tugs on your heart with a mix of humor and sorrow. And I’d be remiss if I didn’t comment on how much the backing vocals/harmonies add to the proceedings with the title track and Happy Unhappy being a prime examples of that.

They will be touring the States this fall with a stop in Chicago on 10/5. I’m going to go out on a limb and say this will be a fun one.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

The Beths are here

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Photo by Mason Fairey

The Beth are a New Zealand quartet fronted by Elizabeth Stokes. They play an infectious brand of pop-punk and have a found a good home with Carpark Records for their debut, Future Me Hates Me. Here’s Stokes on the title track.

“There’s a lot of sad sincerity in the lyrics. That relies on the music having a light heart and sense of humor to keep it from being too earnest.” Channeling their stew of personal-canon heroes while drawing inspiration from contemporaries like Alvvays and Courtney Barnett, The Beths serve up deeply emotional lyrics packaged within heavenly sounds that delight in probing the limits of the pop form. “That’s another New Zealand thing,” Stokes concludes with a laugh. “We’re putting our hearts on our sleeves—and then apologizing for it.”

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

The Beths are here

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