Springtime Carnivore

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The voice of Greta Morgan, the woman behind Springtime Carnivore, really began to grow on me with her excellent set of punk covers with La Sera’s Katy Goodman. Hearing the lead track of Midnight Room heightened my expectations for her sophomore effort.

For the most part it delivers. The album kind of works somewhere between Neko and Lucius, and that’s a good place to me. Written during a stretch of sleepless nights after a breakup, the album belies that stressful time as the album has this breezy, easy-going feel for the most part.

This album has a been a nice fall album for me. I walked to the office the other day with this in my ears and I actually showed up with a smile. In addition to the title track, Under The Spell and Face In The Moon are among my favorites.

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Springtime Carnivore is here

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Katy Goodman (La Sera & Vivian Girls) and Greta Morgan (Springtime Carnivore) took on an ambitious project by covering 10 punk tunes from 70s and 80s and knocked it out of the park. I’m by no means the all-knowing word on punk music. Of the 10 songs on the album, I was really familiar with half while the other half were vaguely familiar or new to me. The ladies transitioned these tunes of frustration and angst sung from a male perspective, and stripped them down and them made all sorts of beautiful with shimmery reverb-laden guitars with beautiful female harmonies.

Naturally, I was initially drawn to the tracks I knew. Bastards Of The Young by The Replacements was my first taste and I must have spun that track 10 times the day they released it. I was absolutely mesmerized on what they did to one of my favorite tunes by The Mats. Next up was Where Eagles Dare by The Misfits. Hearing them harmonize, “I ain’t no goddam son of a bitch, you better think about it, baby” is sexy as fuck. Then I dug into the tunes I didn’t know that well by listening to their version and going back to the original. Ever Fallen In Love by The Buzzcocks just sounds wonderful in their hands. Pay To Cum by Bad Brains turns the tune on its head in a bewildering manner.

I’m usually not that big of a fan of cover albums. But this is every bit as good as The Day of Dead compilation released earlier this year.

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Great Morgan is here

Katy Goodman is here

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“‘Face in the Moon’ was written in a 15 minute flash after a week of lovelorn, sleepless nights watching space conspiracy documentaries and listening to Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska & REM’s Murmur.” – Greta Morgan

Fuck yeah!!! Well, not the lovelorn and not sleeping stuff. That sucks. But an album inspired by a deliriously tired woman that has listened to nothing but Murmur & Nebraska on repeat. Oh, did I mention she has a beautiful voice as well. Midnight Room will be out via the fine folks at Autumntone Records on 10/7/16. Here’s some info on the album.

You know the curious, almost out-of-body feeling you sometimes get when you wake up in the middle of the night, where everything seems a bit fuzzy and you’re not sure if maybe you’re still dreaming? It’s a state Greta Morgan perpetually revisited during the second half of 2015, when she was writing and recording the new Springtime Carnivore album, Midnight Room. “I was on a really jagged sleep schedule,” says the Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter, describing the months during which she worked on the follow-up to her critically adored 2014 debut. “It was the first time I’d ever lived by myself, and there was this bizarre feeling at night of the house being so quiet and being so totally alone. And Midnight Room came out of that.”

Earlier in the year, Morgan went through one of those break-ups that completely topples your world. Though it was as amicable as those things can be, the twenty-eight year-old musician felt shattered. She began working on songs for Midnight Room during those strange waking interludes last summer, finding an abundance of beautiful melodies in the melancholy ether. “A lot of lyrics on the record are collaged or don’t necessarily make sense next to each other,” she says. “But I guess my whole headspace was like that for a few months. I felt like I couldn’t trust my memory completely — like i was space cadeting through the weird space between sleeping and dreaming and waking and reality.”

The melodies came easily, but the words were initially harder to find. So she tried a new approach for Midnight Room’s lyrics, inspired by her own disjointed thinking during those months. When an intriguing phrase or evocative image occurred to her, she wrote it down on a piece of index card. Sitting with the dozens of scraps on the floor in front of her, Morgan would rearrange the fragments until she found a way to make sense of it all. “A lot of the themes are, like, ‘How do you lovingly change a relationship?,'” she says. “How do you say good-bye to someone in a certain way and still keep him or her in your life? I feel like I was asking a lot of questions during the making of the record that I still don’t really have answers to, but at least some of the songs were exploring that territory.”

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Springtime Carnivore is here

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Springtime Carnivore, the project of Los Angeles-based, Chicago-bred Greta Morgan, released her debut album last fall via Aquarium Drunkard’s Autumn Tone Records. I haven’t spent too much time with the s/t debut but that won’t stop me from stating that this is one of the best videos you’ll see this year. It’s brilliance is in its simplicity and its execution. Here’s some more info.

One of the album’s standout songs is the intimate and aching ballad, “Other Side of the Boundary,” where Morgan’s raw emotions and impressive vocal range are on full display. Today, Morgan shares the extraordinary visual accompaniment for this song, directed by her ex-boyfriend and consistent collaborator Eddie O’Keefe. As described by Morgan, who stars in the video, “There are borders around every image — boundaries around each person — and we made them very prominent to represent the wall we all carry around ourselves, which only allows certain people to enter at certain times. The question I’m exploring is when and how can we reach the other side of those divides.” Read Noisey’s premiere for a deeper look into the story behind this video’s conception.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Springtime Carnivore is here

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