Ron Gallo

I’ve enjoyed Ron Gallo – his music and his online persona – since I came across him a few years ago. He’s kind of a free-spirited wild card in that you don’t what you’re going to get with his music. Peacemeal will see the light of day on 10/9 via the fine folks at New West Records. Here’s Gall on the track below.

“It’s an introvert summertime party jam celebrating alone time and isolation, but then after too much solo time starting to go crazy.,I think I wanted this song to sound like Will Smith’s outfits in Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, blending the jazz chords with an old-school boom-bap beat. A very simple, sort of stupid, feel good song.”

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Ron Gallo is here

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I’ve seen Ron Gallo live a few times. I’ve listened to this LP, his debut and the EP in between numerous times. I think at this point I can safely say that Ron is not one for conventions. He’s got an idea of what he wants to do and he’s going to do it his way. So if you’re in the market for straight-ahead punkish garage rock, Gallo might not be your speed. But if you’re looking for someone who’s going to run that through his own prism, than Gallo might be your man.

The inspiration for this album was Gallo’s new found appreciation for meditation and how your personal inner-transformation can affect everything that’s going on around you. The album is broken into two halves – the first being dark and lost; while the second seems to be Gallo coming out of the darkness to enjoy life; the transition being the track, OM – a voice mail from Ron’s mind to Ron himself backed by the sound that I associated with meditation. It’s a clever demarcation that is delivered tongue-in-cheek style that I’ve come to associate with Gallo. My favorite tracks are Always Elsewhere and It’s All Gonna Be OK, the first full track on either side of his transformation. But to truly appreciate this album, it needs to be listened to front to back.

It appears that Gallo is on a quest to find fulfillment and happiness. Who knows if he’s there yet? For that matter, who knows if any of us are there yet? But I appreciate the fact that he is allowing us along for the ride, while penning some truly compelling tracks.

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Ron Gallo is here

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Ron Gallo is set to follow up on 2017’s excellent American Meta with Stardust Birthday Party, via the fine folks at New West. I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting Ron but I find him a truly unique and intriguing character via interview and articles. Here’s some more info on the album via the PR folks.

A life-altering, seismic shift in Gallo’s life is what led to Stardust Birthday Party – a counterpoint to Heavy Meta and a spiritual 180.The girl he’d been seeing had taken herself to South America at the height of her addiction, found a healer and had miraculously come out on the other side in 2016. It got Gallo’s interest piqued in an inward path and he began reading, searching. On a whim in early 2018, he booked a trip to California for a silent meditation retreat. Despite his initial discomfort, something significant occurred on day two that served as a singular answer to all his existential searching, and reaffirmed the foundation of this record – inner-transformation and how that impacts the outside world and your perception of it.

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Ron Gallo is here

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Ron Gallo – Heavy Meta (album review)

by Woody on April 13, 2017

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I was familiar with Gallo’s work with his band, Toy Soldiers. It was solid enough but I can’t say it ever cracked my rotation for long. So the announcement of his solo debut was met with little fanfare by myself. But sooner or later, the album crossed my path and we became fast friends.

Heavy Meta is chock full of meaty hooks and Gallo has a swagger that belies his age, as he tears through 11 tracks blending punk, garage and glam. Throughout the albums, Gallo tackles a wide variety of interesting subjects. I love the Kill The Medicine Man seems to take a swipe at America’s penchant for over-medicating themselves. The album closes with All the Punks are Domesticated closes the album and is smart take down of Gallo’s contemporaries. Why Do You Have Kids? lays out a thought we’ve all had about someone who’ve you seen on in your day to day.

Heavy Meta is an album you enjoy more with each listen as you dig deeper into the lyrics. It is easy for the lyrics to get lost in the riffs but they’re well worth the effort.

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Ron Gallo is here

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