Priests

photo by Drew Hagelin

After seeing Priests at SXSW and reading numerous articles on Priests, I think they are going to be an iconic band of this generation. They have this brilliant combination of brains, style, talent and drive.

For their second album, the sound of Priests has evolved. Inspired by 2004’s What’s the Matter With Kansas? by Thomas Frank; drummer Daniele Daniele, vocalist Katie Alice Greer, and guitarist G.L. Jaguar have moved forward without original bassist Taylor Mulitz (now leading Flasher). They went out of their way not to recreate Nothing Feels Natural working in numerous influences, and the results are phenomenal.

Throughout Seduction, Priests combine some of lore of America with the current state of America. Jesus Son is a ripping opener, basically imagining a white man that has complained how hard it is to be a white man as the second coming. It is subtle and brilliant. A couple of tracks later on I’m Clean, channels her inner Karen O. Good Time Charlie is another brilliant track, chronicling the story of Charlie Wilson. Towards the end, Control Freak gets the hair standing up on the back of your neck as Greer spits out her venom.

Priests sophomore album is everything I hoped for. I’m already excited to see what to see what they do for LP3 beyond.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Priests are here

{ 0 comments }

photo by Drew Hagelin

Priests are in their 8th year as a band and in 2017, their appeal and notoriety really took off with their debut LP, Nothing Feels Natural. I saw them a couple of times that year, including once at SXSW. They’ll be back on the road this year, including a stop in Austin. Here’s some info from the PR team.

It is dark and glittering—though there is still something fantastically off about it, decadent and uneasy at once. As journalist Thomas Frank explored in 2004’s What’s the Matter With Kansas?, the ideological sway of Kansas has often predicted the direction in which the U.S. will move—whether leaning socialist in the 1800s or going staunchly conservative in the 1980s. Illustrating Kansas’ potent place in our national imagination—as well as “a chorus of whoever is trying to persuade the social consciousness of Kansas”—Greer sings brilliantly of a “bloodthirsty cherub choir” in a cornfield, of “a drawn out charismatic parody of what a country through it used to be,” beckoning that “I’m the one who loves you.”

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Priests are @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa“>here

{ 0 comments }

Priests

Last year, I took on the ambitious task of reading City On Fire. A big portion of the story centers around the nascent punk scene in Lower Manhattan circa 197x; even before I started going to shows. While I can’t validate how accurate Garth Risk Hallberg’s portrayal is; in listening to Priests I kind of get transported back in time – into the pages of that book. Fronted by Katie Alice Greer, Priests are emboldened by “I don’t give a fuck” attitude that permeates throughout their music.

Five years deep into a career forged on a career booking all-aged shows and building a rep via word of mouth; Priests finally release a proper LP. The result is a slightly more melodic album that lacks none of punch and explosion that their prior EPs delivered.

The album starts off with Appropriate; a track that takes 45 seconds to introduce the guitar and the melts into a noisy mess at the end. The next track is the lead single, JJ, a great track built around a surf-guitar lick as Greer’s delivery takes on a real soulful edge to it. From there, you get fits of spoken word, tunes that haunt you and songs that break into frenzied chants. Shit is all over the board and you are on the edge of your seat throughout.

Good punk music is meant to antagonize you, get under your skin and that is something Priests achieve here. What little I’ve read about them, I’m not anticipating them going soft any time soon.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Priests are @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa“>here

{ 0 comments }

Priests

Priests are a four piece punk band from DC that has been fueling an emergence of the punk scene in and around DC. They put out an EP a few years back on Don Giovanni that was excellent and they are set to release their debut LP on January 27th. Based on these first two tracks, it is sure to be a winner. Here’s what lead singer Katie Alice Greer had this to say of the song and video, Pink White House.

Lyrically, this is a Priests song I am maybe most proud of to date. I am very inspired by the filmmaker Adam Curtis, the first time I saw “It Felt Like A Kiss” I thought, man, I want to start a band where I can write lyrics the way this guy makes films, like these politically pointed surreal avant-garde narratives, and then I met Daniele and we started Priests. So for me, “Pink White House” is a step towards achieving this style of lyricism. I’m excited about that. Musically we wrote the first half and then were like, “where do we go from here?” We wanted the second half of the song to feel like you’re in a new scene of the story, where “come on palm trees” starts. It was very fun and adventurous for us, writing this way! For the video, I wanted to do something playing on the notion that pop culture repackages your identity and sells it back to you for “entertainment.”

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Priests aren’t on Twitter but the label they run is here

{ 0 comments }