Nap Eyes

Nap Eyes – I’m Bad Now (album review)

by Woody on March 21, 2018

Credit: Matthew Parri Thomas

I’m not slagging off their first two albums, but I’m Bad Now packs more of a wallop from the get go. The guitar riffs have more punch, the rhythm section thumps a bit more and Nigel Champman’s vocals are delivered with a bit more gusto. It’s almost as if they found out people were digging their albums and they could take off the training wheels and go for it.

That being said, the Nova Scotia quartet hasn’t morphed into a metal band. The crux of the band remains Champman’s wry observations over some chill indie jams. I wouldn’t say that the opener, Every Time The Feeling has us moving out warp speed. But it is apparent, Nap Eyes has moved one lane to the left.

A couple of tunes later, Roses steps on the gas even more but the uptick in tempo is balanced superbly with some tasty slide guitar as Chapman espouses wisdom on looking for yourself in other in the world around you. The album then closes with the two longest tracks on the album as they take their foot of the gas. White Disciple is almost dreamy in its approach and that’s followed by Boats Appear; a track that sounds like it was written by Chapman as he sat on a rock in the harbor. With every release, these guys keep taking steps forward.

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Nap Eyes is here

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Nap Eyes announce I’m Bad Now – 3/9/18

by Woody on January 15, 2018

Credit: Matthew Parri Thomas

Halifax-based Nap Eyes are back with their third album, I’m Bad Now. It will see the light on 3/9 via a combo release between Paradise of Bachelors and Jagjaguwar (depending on where you live). The lead track, Every Time The Feeling, is a winner. They’re still kicking off a Lou Reed vibe but the sound seems to be expanding a bit. Anyway, I’m pretty pumped for this one as I really enjoyed their first two efforts.

Here’s some info on the album via lead singer, Nigel Chapman. The brilliantly reductive title is something I’ve heard my four-year-old son and his friends announce verbatim when roleplaying the perennial game of heroes and villains, “good guys” and “bad guys.” “I’m bad now,” he declares, but an equivocal binary is implied: it’s only a matter of time or trading places before he (or anyone) has the capacity for good again. Perhaps goodness will manifest in the multiverse, on a different circuit than this faulty, frayed one. Is that faith or fantasy? And what is the difference?

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Nap Eyes is here

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Photo by Colin Medley

Their first album, Whine Of The Mystic, sort of arrived out of nowhere when Paradise of Bachelor heard it, liked it and re-released it to the world. Plaudits followed from buffoons like me and respected journalists as well. Soon, people were expecting a second album, leading to the dreaded sophomore album.

Whine Of The Mystic was this hyper-literate album about drinking. It sounds childish when you write it but it was actually pretty deep. It was more an observance of the culture that painted outside the lines to look at the highs and lows. Lead singer, chief songwriter and bi0-chemist, Nigel Chapman, has this uncanny knack for painting vivid detail for the mundane. His vocals rarely ever make it out of first gear. As the vocals ease of the speaker, you feel as if he’s sitting next to you telling you a story, in a way that nobody else could. Chapman might not be the coolest guy in the room but he sure as hell is the guy that describes the room in the coolest manner.

Click Clack has my favorite line of the album – “Sometimes, drinking, I feel so happy but then / I can’t remember why … Sometimes, drinking, I don’t know my best friend for my best friend.” It is one of the few times in the album where Chapman’s voice heightens and the band subtly kicks in behind him. It is really tasty. The last verse of the album on Trust is another winner, “I know you don’t trust me but I got some things I need to tell you anyway. Sometimes I can hardly believe the way you don’t believe me when I say what you do.,” before the chorus kicks in and the album fades to black.

I was really looking forward to this album and am happy to say it ticked off all the boxes I was looking for. If you’re new to the band, get on it. Both albums are outstanding.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa

Nap Eyes is here

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Nap-Eyes-Polaroid-2-web

Photo by Colin Medley

I was all set to include Whine Of the Mystic in HearYa’s Best of 2015 until I just learned that it came it out in 2014. Luckily for me, they have announced their follow-up, Thought Rock Fish Scale, so I can pencil them in for 2016. The lovely folks at Paradise of Bachelors will be releasing it on February 5th. Here’s a little info on Thought Rock Fish Scale.

Recorded live to tape, with no overdubs, on the North Shore of Nova Scotia, Nap Eyes’ quietly contemplative sophomore record refines and elaborates their debut, offering an airier, more spacious second chapter, a bracing blast of bright oceanic sunshine after the moonlit alleys of Whine of the Mystic (PoB-20). But the briny, cold Atlantic roils beneath these exquisite, literate guitar pop songs, posing riddles about friendship, faith, mortality, and self-doubt.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa

Nap Eyes is here

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Nap Eyes – Whine Of The Mystic [album review}

July 8, 2015

Upon spinning Nap Eyes for the first time, I couldn’t help but be reminded of Parquet Courts. It might not veer off the rails like some Parquet Courts tracks do but the nine tracks off Whine Of The Mystic share that quality of rumbling forward with little care of what stands in its way. Recorded […]

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Nap Eyes – Whine Of The Mystic re-released on 7/10/15

May 19, 2015

Paradise of Bachelors is set to release Whine Of The Mystic by Nova Scotia’s Nap Eyes. Nap Eyes consists of Josh Salter (bass), Seamus Dalton (drums), and Brad Loughead (lead guitar) and Paradise of Bachelors is calling them the greatest band you’ve never heard of. I don’t how you would disprove that so I’m going […]

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