Mount Moriah

Photo courtesy of Merge

Here at HearYa (yes I just wrote it), we love Mount Moriah something fierce. Now lead singer, H.C. McEntire is releasing a solo album. The driving force behind getting this album made was none other than Kathleen Hanna. The track below sounds like Mount Moriah in that it has some Americana flavor, but man is this track soulful. Simply put, I absolutely love this track.

She says of the album: “In music, there are no rules. You make your own language. You can be both the Southern rock outlier and the twangy gospel conduit. You can be both the cherubic, honey-tongued innocent and the ardent punk. To get here—to find my lion heart—I had to become them all.”

LIONHEART is a collection of songs inspired by the American South and a desire to reclaim “country” music from the hetero-normative, homogenous schtick of tailgates and six-packs and men chasing women. Stereogum describes McEntire’s voice as “weary, wise, and bright as morning sunshine all at once,” and that sunshine glows throughout the triumphant LIONHEART.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or at @HearYa

H.C. McEntire is here

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Mount Moriah – How To Dance {album review}

by Woody on February 22, 2016

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Mount Moriah tweeted out that statement when they announced How To Dance. And they backed up their statement of intent, as they have ratcheted their game up on their third album, How To Dance. Their first two efforts were excellent due to solid songwriting, Heather McEntire’s twang and the unreal tones that Jenks Miller would produce out of his guitar. Their music was a constant joy that I would find myself reaching for in a variety of settings.

But my word, How To Dance is pretty spectacular. It just seems like there is more going on. The songs are fleshed out with horns, strings and a more ambitious rhythm section. McEntire and Miller could have kept cranking out twang albums in the same manner and cobbled together a nice Americana catalog.

Yet, How To Dance is McEntire and Miller challenging themselves and answering the bell. With the bigger and more complex sound, McEntire’s vocals somehow seems to stand out more than on prior effots. Miller’s guitar playing has never been better. For someone who’s other job is a metal band, he has always showed amazing restraint with Mount Moriah. During his live shows, it barely looks like he’s trying but the yet magic would calmly ooze out of his guitar. The restraint is still here but it sounds like he enjoys having the additional texture in the tunes.

As much as like their first two efforts, these songs seem to stick with you longer. Baby Blue, Cardinal Cross and the title track really have staying power. I love seeing a band take a big step forward and this album really makes me happy.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa

Mount Moriah is here

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MM

Mount Moriah have just announced the first album of 2016 that is guaranteed to be on HearYa’s best of 2016 list. For those not familiar with Mount Moriah, they are a throwback twang band fronted by the vocal styling of Heather McEntire with a guitarist, Jenks Miller, that gets some of the amazing tones you’ll ever from a guitar. How To Dance, is their third album, second for Merge, and it will see the light of day on 2/26/16. Take a listen to the first track, Cardinal Cross, is below. Here’s some info on the album.

The North Carolina-based band Mount Moriah—composed of Heather McEntire (lead vocals, guitar), Jenks Miller (lead guitar, keys), and Casey Toll (bass, keys)—seem insistent to grow. If Mount Moriah’s self-titled debut showed them standing with sea legs, determined to dream their way free from the dark crevices and corners of alt-country’s stiff template; and if Miracle Temple, their second album, called that darkness by its Southern name and met it with fire; then their latest collection of songs, How to Dance, is a devotion to the cosmic light itself: moving towards it, moving into it, becoming it. Mount Moriah’s third full-length sees them stretching further to explore their collective interest in the intangible fringes of fate and synchronicity. With How to Dance, the band presents new themes of symbolism, mysticism, alchemy, universality, sacred geometry. There is color, confidence, self-direction, joy. There is also darkness, but only to show you how it found its light.

In I’m Not There, a film supposition of Bob Dylan’s life, the version of Dylan played by Cate Blanchett—the pre-motorcycle crash, Blonde on Blonde Dylan—says that “a poem is like a naked person,” and then, blending into the same line, “but a song is something that walks by itself.” Mount Moriah have created a continuous dialogue with humanity, with the metaphysical, with the ecology right in front of us. Here, in How to Dance, everything walks by itself.

Here’s our 2011 HearYa session

Here’s a link regarding their 7″ they just put out.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Mount Moriah is here

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Mount Moriah release new track, announce 7″

by Woody on September 22, 2015

MM

Long time HearYa favorites, Mount Moriah, have released a new track to tide you over until they release their third LP. Here’s a little on the 7″ – “Calvander” adds sprightly horns to the beauty of Heather McEntire’s powerful voice as she narrates a fierce journey toward redemption. A demo “garage rock” version of new live favorite “Baby Blue” and the band’s intimate performance of “Plane” at Raleigh’s Fletcher Opera House during the 2013 Hopscotch Festival round out this release.

Of the song’s meaning, Heather McEntire shares: “Somewhere in the depths of anguish there is optimism, right there on the edge of the darkness—the faith that the magic of the world will not let you down completely.”

Here’s our 2011 HearYa session

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Mount Moriah is here

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Mount Moriah – Miracle Temple [album review]

July 16, 2013

Was reminded that we had forgot to review this album when I received an email from Merge on Mount Moriah’s new video for White Sands. I hadn’t listened to Miracle Temple for a month or so but upon revisiting it, I loved it even more. Lead singer Heather McEntire is often compared to a young […]

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Mount Moriah – Younger Days [mp3]. Miracle Temple out 2/26/13

December 11, 2012

Back in 2011, HearYa became smitten with Mount Moriah. Later that year, they graced HearYa World Headquarters with a memorable session. As we enter 2013, they are getting to release their follow up to that amazing debut on the legendary Merge Records. It will be called Miracle Temple and will be released on Feb 26. […]

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Mount Moriah signs with Merge Records

September 18, 2012

Got some great news today. HearYa session alumni Mount Moriah has signed to the legendary Merge Records. We have decided to take all the credit as I am sure that most of it was based on our HearYa Session. Mount Moriah join HearYa alumni The Love Language who also joined Merge after a HearYa Session […]

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Mount Moriah, Live Session #95, featuring unreleased “Swannanoa”

November 4, 2011

Mount Moriah is my favorite discovery of 2011. Founding members, Heather McEntire and Jenks Miller, admit to resenting their North Carolinian Southern Gospel roots in their former bands. In creating Mount Moriah, however, they embrace folk, gospel and alt-country in pursuit of a gorgeous and melancholy batch of songs that underscores the changing season. After […]

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Mount Moriah – Self Titled [Album Review]

May 16, 2011

Lately, we’ve been talking about breakout albums and our favorite music discoveries of 2011. Add Mount Moriah to both lists. Heather McEntire and Jenks Miller are the two-piece that created Mount Moriah, but their sound is much larger than themselves. That’s because they’ve enlisted the help of friends, including members of Megafaun, St. Vincent, Gayngs, […]

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