Luke Winslow-King

LWK

We here at HearYa have enjoyed the hell out of Luke Winslow-King’s two Bloodshot albumy walked awas. I’ve had the pleasure of seeing him live a few times and always impressed. LWK is back with his third Bloodshot effort and based on the first track, I’m Glad Trouble Don’t Last Always will have an edgier sound. Here’s some info from Bloodshot.

Luke Winslow-King draws from a deep, dark creative well, turning heartbreak and divorce into an inspired soundtrack for picking up the pieces. Electric and sentimentally raw, this album is part sonic travelogue, part handbook on navigating the stages of grief. It pulses through LWK’s geographical stomping grounds, starting with the pre-war jive of New Orleans, travelling the bloodlines that flow along the Mississippi River towards the Delta bottleneck-slide, and the funky meter of Memphis R&B. Further north, it takes a right for an infusion of greasy Chicago blues, and arrives at the headwaters of his birthplace in rural Michigan for some tell-‘em-like-it-is confessionals.

The album was written and recorded while Luke and his newly formed band were on a 2015 summer tour in Italy (and later finished in New Orleans’s Parlor Studios, mixed by Colin DuPuis, engineer for the Black Keys). The New Orleans-based polymath matches a technical wizardry with a thematic immediacy detailing a relationship in freefall. The songs unfold as diary entries put to his idiosyncratic blend of roots, pop and rock. It’s a Luke Winslow-King record unlike any he’s ever done; he’s found the light in the darkness and he’s plugging in and turning up to bare his soul.

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Luke Winslow-King is here

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LWK

In my review of his Bloodshot debut, The Coming Tide, I compared Luke Winslow-King (LWK) to Justin Townes Earle (JTE). For one they both have three names. Second, they both have a dedication to the way music used to be and the ability to pull it off. I caught LWK’s set at the Bloodshot SXSW showcase this past March. Accompanied by only his wife, Esther Rose, they breezed through a 45 minute set that encompassed bits of country, ragtime and Delta blues.

The songs on Everlasting Arms have such a nice variety. The title track, a rewrite of A. Showalter, comes off sounding like LWK and Rose are sitting on a porch in the Garden District trading verses as LWK works in his bottle-neck guitar. That is followed by a crunchy Delta blues riff and LWK’s muted howls. The song cooks because its a) excellent and b) it stands out in a way that Lord I Just Can’t Keep From Cryin’ does on The Barr Brothers debut. Followed up by Levee Man, a track that couldn’t celebrate New Orleans any more unless it was recorded in a club on Frenchmen.

LWK is going to be The Hideout tomorrow night for his record release. I will be up near his hometown of Cadillac, MI for a wedding of fellow LWK fan and friend of HearYa, El Jefe. Tell LWK and Esther we said hello.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa

LWK is here

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LWK

Luke Winslow-King and his wife Esther Rose put on one of my favorite sets of SXSW ’14 at The Continental Club. They played tracks off their fantastic 2013 debut, The Coming Tide and some from Everlasting Arms. Based on that, I am going to go out on a limb and say, “Everlasting Arms is going to be pretty darn swell. Everlasting Arms will see the light of day on 9/30 via the fine folks of Bloodshot Records. Check out the title track below and read some stuff from Bloodshot’s PR.

Winslow-King is a guitarist/singer/songwriter from New Orleans, LA by way of Cadillac, MI. Following his critically acclaimed Bloodshot Records debut The Coming Tide in 2013, LWK (for brevity’s sake) has been as hardworking a musician as they come. Subsequent tours in the United States and overseas with his singing partner (and now wife) Esther Rose and a mutating band (including the core of upright bassist Cassidy Holden, drummer Benji Bohannon, and trumpeter/keyboardist Ben Polcer) landed the group in front of larger audiences while sharing the stage with the likes of Jack White, Pokey Lafarge, Taj Mahal, Chris Thile, and Rebirth Brass Band. Winslow-King’s second release for Bloodshot in as many years, Everlasting Arms finds inspiration in the developmental experiences of life and has LWK & Co. building upon previous creative efforts with a wider scope, exploring a sonically and stylistically panoramic songwriting vision, carrying on in balancing tradition with modernity.

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LWK can be found here

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Luke Winslow King is the newest addition to Bloodshot’s roster. Here is a little bit from his Bloodshot bio. If you want to dig any further, go here. His Bloodshot debut will be out next March and I imagine he’ll be playing at the BackYard BBQ at SXSW.

Luke Winslow-King (born March 12th 1983) is a guitarist, singer, composer, and lyricist known for his slide guitar work, and interest in pre-war blues and traditional jazz. Winslow-King’s work consists of an eclectic mix, taking in delta-folk music, classical composition, ragtime, and rock and roll; juxtaposing original songs with those from a bygone era.

Whether solo, or with a band, Winslow-King offers an original sound that is both rustic and elegant. He delivers energetic and dynamic performances, with his burgundy voice and versatile guitar playing.

WYCE In-Studio – Luke Winslow King – Staying In Town from Wealthy Theatre on Vimeo.

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