Jeremey Ivey

Photo Credit: Ramon Felix

I often get asked how the hell did you get your wife to marry you? I clearly outkicked the coverage when marrying my wife. I’m not suggesting that’s the case with Jeremy Ivey and Margo Price. But I can empathize with him as steps out of the proverbial shadows to release his solo debut LP.

Any thought that he was riding the coattails of his wife’s career will go right out the window after one spin of his debut. Ivey certainly knows his way around a melody, write great lyrics and has the vocal chops to put those lyrics to great affect. At the age of 41, Ivey has a warm weathered voice that feels good pumping into your earholes.

Inspired by Dylan, Neil Young and Leonard Cohen, Ivey’s nine tracks fit the bill for a later afternoon in the backyard. The album opens with Diamonds Back to Coal, sort of a call to arms on what we’re doing to our land. Ivey’s voice is almost pleading at points, which feels apt with our current state. Margo, who produced the album, joins her hubby for a lovely duet on Greyhound. The road weary tune kicks off a Shovels & Rope feel to it. The album closes on the lovely title track, a piano driven track that takes you home.

Ivey is touring with Ian Noe, him of his own excellent solo LP. That’s a show worth seeing.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Jeremy Ivey is here

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Photo Credit: Ramon Felix

Nashville resident, Jeremy Ivey has signed to Anti- Records. He’s released a track to give us an idea of what we have to look forward to when his his debut comes out later this year. Produced by new momma, Margo Price, who also carries the title of Ivey’s better half; this track is quite tasty. More info from the PR team.

Now based in Nashville, Ivey moved away from his conservative Georgia home after high school and bounced around, primarily doing prep work in kitchens. “Story of a Fish” chronicles Ivey’s personal diaspora, specifically relating to his upbringing. “I’m adopted, and I think that I always related with the story of salmon and how they’re born,” he reveals. “The idea of being born far from your home, you know? You were born here, but you gotta get elsewhere. That’s the way I always felt. I always felt that I was born in the wrong place to the wrong people at the wrong time.”

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

Jeremy Ivey is here

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