H.C. McEntire

I have an unhealthy amount of love for McEntire’s work, both solo and with Mount Moriah. So I don’t know how I missed the announcement for the follow up to LIONHEART. The fine folks at Merge will be releasing this fine album on 8/21. Here’s some info from the Merge PR folks.

Unlike McEntire’s solo debut, LIONHEART, which was recorded in sporadic bouts and fits while she was touring, Eno Axis is firmly rooted in place. After two years working all over the world as a backup singer in Angel Olsen’s band, McEntire came home to a hundred-year-old farmhouse tucked away in the woods of Durham, North Carolina, right on the Eno River. Here, McEntire was able to refocus. Like the blue-collar Appalachian kin she descended from, her days were scheduled by the clockwork of the Earth’s rotation: splitting wood, stacking it, weeding and watering the garden, walking the dog past the bridge and back—and every evening on the front porch, watching dusk fall. Eno Axis emerges from this time as the strongest work McEntire has shared yet.

With Eno Axis, H.C. McEntire establishes herself as a force to be reckoned with in the greater American musical landscape. These songs transcend country and gospel, folk and rock—they’re poems directed straight to the listener, simple psalms on how the sun falls, how the train passes, how love grows and bends. McEntire inspires us to find the stillness within our own lives—a remarkable clear-ringing declaration for our uncertain times.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

H.C. McEntire is here

{ 0 comments }

H.C. McEntire – LIONHEART (Album Review)

by Woody on January 31, 2018

LIONHEART sees Heather McEntire stepping out on our own after three magnificent albums with Mount Moriah. With Kathleen Hanna providing the spark to make this record, McEntire enlisted the help of Phil Cook, William Tyler, Angel Olsen among others and the results are fantastic.

Like Mount Moriah, the album is rooted in Americana. The album opens up with A Lamb, A Dove. The tune explores her sexuality in a gospel-themed track; an oxymoron in the traditional country music scene. In today’s time, tracks that ring true with lines “I have found heaven in a woman’s touch. are the pillars we need to carry on. It is an inspired choice to open the album. A couple tunes later, McEntire strikes a more defiant tone with Yellow Roses, in that she wants to be recognized and accepted for her true self.

LIONHEART reminds me of another Merge artist, Hiss Golden Messenger. Both of these artists come across as spiritual without being judgy or preachy; they look to see the good in the world through all the negativity and conflict. That takes a considerable amount of introspection and I’d imagine that it isn’t easy, but with both the results are always stunning.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

H.C. McEntire is here

{ 0 comments }

Photo courtesy of Merge

Here at HearYa (yes I just wrote it), we love Mount Moriah something fierce. Now lead singer, H.C. McEntire is releasing a solo album. The driving force behind getting this album made was none other than Kathleen Hanna. The track below sounds like Mount Moriah in that it has some Americana flavor, but man is this track soulful. Simply put, I absolutely love this track.

She says of the album: “In music, there are no rules. You make your own language. You can be both the Southern rock outlier and the twangy gospel conduit. You can be both the cherubic, honey-tongued innocent and the ardent punk. To get here—to find my lion heart—I had to become them all.”

LIONHEART is a collection of songs inspired by the American South and a desire to reclaim “country” music from the hetero-normative, homogenous schtick of tailgates and six-packs and men chasing women. Stereogum describes McEntire’s voice as “weary, wise, and bright as morning sunshine all at once,” and that sunshine glows throughout the triumphant LIONHEART.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or at @HearYa

H.C. McEntire is here

{ 0 comments }