didi

didi – Like Memory Foam (album review)

by Woody on November 27, 2018

CREDIT: Hello Hillary Photo

didi, a four piece from Columbus, OH that came together in 2013 when singer/guitarist Meg Zakany and drummer Sheena McGrath began jamming together before getting singer/guitarist Kevin Bilapka-Arbelaez and singer/bassist Leslie Shimizu.

It took me a few listens to really find me way with this album. At first, I thought it was a solid enough album of 90s inspired indie rock. But as you began to peel away at the onion, you hear all four of the voices blending together to become one. Going back to read their PR, they make a point of stating that they wanted to “eschews a single charismatic leader in favor of allowing all members the freedom to write and sing.”

With the variety of voices, you’re going to get some interesting topics. muerde is one of my faves, sung in Spanish about the death of the “American Dream” and the struggle to stand back up in spite of cynicism and bigotry; it really feels timely now. A little later, heavy ghosts (looking back at an ended relationship) and moon jelly (about the natural powers that women possess) are a nice one-two.

The unpredictable nature of Like Memory Foam is its most endearing trait. You never know who’s going to pop on the vocals and once you’re locked into a tune, you never know how things are going to turn out. It’s a real fun album to keep digging away at.

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

didi is here

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CREDIT: Hello Hillary Photo

didi are a quartet that got their start in Columbus, OH. Singer/guitarist Meg Zakany and drummer Sheena McGrath met at school and subsequently recruited singer/guitarist Kevin Bilapka-Arbelaez and singer/bassist Leslie Shimizu from the local DIY scene. If you are a fan of Speedy, Diet Cig or Swearin’, I’d check these guys out. Here’s some more info on their sophomore album from the PR team.

On their sophomore album, like memory foam, Zakany, Bilapka-Arbelaez and Shimizu all lend their voices to songs that seek to explore, among other things, the power of an ambiguous identity, be it in terms of race, gender, class or otherwise, to navigate difficult or guarded conversations (“anzaldúa”); the pain of forgetting what once seemed to be an unforgettable love (“heavy ghosts”); and the sting a woman is capable of in the face of an unchecked man socialized to underestimate her (“moon jelly”).

Follow me on Twitter at @WoodyHearYa or @HearYa

didi is here

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